Full Moon Chant — Heather Houston

This chant flowed through me one magical full moon night while having a soak in my outdoor bathtub. Luxurious!

Lyrics:

In the light of the full moon I am love
Offering my prayers to rise above
The thoughts and the fears that hold me down
From thriving on this earth
As she spins around

In the light of the full moon I am peace
Offering my heart to be released
From the things that no longer serve my soul
Knowing now that I am whole

© Heather Houston
All rights reserved

Image by Beverly Ash Gilbert

Cherokee Morning Song – Traditional

Chanting the sun up! This one resonates deeply with my soul. I thank the ones who channeled this beautiful song through. Learned from from a Waleala CD.

Public Domain

Lyrics:

Winde ya ho
Winde ya ho
Winde ya
Winde ya
Ho ho ho ho
Hey oh hey oh
Ya ya ya

Birthday Blessing — Heather Houston

Written for my Sisters in Harmony circles and my choir Yala Lati. A beautiful way to bless each other for our birthdays. We put the birthday women of the day or month into the middle of the circle and ask them to receive the blessing of our hearts and voices singing to them.

© Heather Houston
All rights reserved

Lyrics:

We adore you beautiful one
We see your light shine like the sun
And we bless you on this day
Knowing angels guide the way

Lingmarra — Australian Aboriginal Chant arr. by Balang T. E. Lewis

I love gathering my communities of singers together with this beautiful chant. I learned it from one of my sisters on the path of song leading, Maggie Wheeler, whose source was the Melbourne Millennium Choir.

Origin notes paraphrased from Melanie Shanahan, MMC choir director: Lingmarra is an Aboriginal song from Arnhem Land and the words are a phonetic translation of “Let us all come together” in a non-descript Aborigine language. There are so many different tongues in the Northern Territories that it was too hard for all of them to be spoken or translated so they used a language that the heart would understand instead. One person would begin the round while sitting at a fire in the middle of an area central to all the tribes and one by one, others would join until everyone was present.

Lyrics:
Lingmarra lingmarra gumba
Lingmarra lingmarra gumba
Lingmarra lingmarra gumba

This chant is in the public domain.

More about its history can be found here: The Story of ‘Lingmarra’ and the CMVic Network

Chant to Nana by Heather Houston

In the Yoruba traditions, Nana is the Great Grandmother of all the Orishas, the Grandmother of our sacred waters, and the Mother of the Universe. This wise and revered Orisha embodies the spirit of the earth, the moon, the rain, mud, swamps and fresh spring waters. She is the energy of transformative healing powers. She watches over the women and is the protector of everything female. It is said that she has very little patience for men and surrounds herself mainly with priestesses. Women find comfort in her knowledge and strength. They flock to her for guidance and spiritual healing.

For many years I chanted chants to Nana with my teacher Alba Lirio. One day when I was driving through the hills of Marin, tending to my broken heart, an original melody flowed through me with lyrics to Nana. I clearly needed the healing energy she brings, and have been forever grateful for the gift of this chant. The women in my circles adore it as well.

Lyrics:

Part 1: (the round)
Eh na na Eh na na Eh na na, Eh na na Eh na na Eh

Part 2: (the hight part)
Eh di na na eh wa
Eh wa eh wa
Eh wa eh wa eh

Part 3: (the low part)
Eh di na na eh wa
Eh wa eh wa
Eh wa eh wa

Zominamina from the Ivory Coast

A gathering song from the Ivory Coast. I learned this one from an Inkululeko CD back in 2000 when I was teaching elementary school. I arranged the harmonies for my students. It became a favorite for all of the grades, every year. Adults love it too! 😉

Try keeping the rhythm in your hands or feet as you sing it.

This song is in the public domain.

Lyrics:

Zominamina eh eh
Wake wake eh eh eh
Zominamina zonga le wa
Ana wa ah ah

Zongo eh eh eh
Zongo eh eh eh
Zominamina zonga le wa
Ana wa ah ah

Wood Stone by Joules Graves

This song is a most beloved classic in my song circles. I’ve been teaching it since 2005 and everyone loves it! It’s one that people can really sing out on. I typically use a rattle to help keep the beat. Enjoy!

This song is in the public domain.

Lyrics:

Wood stone feather and bone
Roaring of the ocean guide us home
x2
High angel singing
x2
In my soul
x4
River sea redwood tree
Howling of the wind gonna set us free
x2
High angel singing
x2
In my soul
x4

Rainforest Chant from Ituri Rainforest (Democratic Republic of Congo)

I learned this chant from Silvia Nakkach and Alba Lirio. Brought to Silvia and Alba through Ysaye Barnwell. Quote from Ysaye Barnwell of Sweet Honey in the Rock: “[This chant is] Sung to pull all of the members of the community into the center of the community. It can be sung for hours and, some people say, even days. If that’s what it takes to pull everyone into a like‐mindedness.” I’ve also heard that the chief of the village would know that it was time to resolve a conflict when he could hear a melody being sung over the top with overtones. And I actually hear it one time, with my very first circle of song circle trainees! Amazing!

A real crowd pleaser in my circles, and beautiful way to entrain the group. Can be done more slowly at first.

This song is in the public domain.

Lyrics:

Ama ee boo oh ee ay
Ama ee boo oh ee ay

Mochi Numba from Kenya

An uplifting gathering song from Kenya. I use this one often when opening a circle. “Welcome to my village, you are all a part of my village, we are all one village.” I learned this song from my dear singing sister Debbie Nargi Brown.

Lyrics:

Ay Yai mochi numba
Ay Yai mochi numba
Go berri samba mochi numba
Go berri samba mochi numba
Go berri chickede mochi numba
Go berri checkede mochi numba

How Sweet the Sound by Doug Vonkoss

A dreamy song that I learned around the campfire at Song Village. It can be sung just as is, or in a round. I loved it so much that I tracked down the composer and asked his permission to use it in my song library.

© Doug Vankoss
All rights reserved

Recorded with permission from Doug
https://dougvonkoss.com

Lyrics:

How sweet the sound was in the night,
the melody flowed like water,
the women sang of the moon’s delights,
and the men all sang about honey.

Difficulty Level: 2